Parting with your ponytail can help cover someone else’s loss – 96five Family Radio

Parting with your ponytail can help cover someone else’s loss

By 96five Thursday 30 Aug 2018

By: Warren Nunn

The Ponytail Project inspires young women to part with their hair for a special cause.


About 80 students from St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School in Brisbane this week made the unselfish decision to have their ponytails chopped off.

The project started in 2015 when four students wanted to raise money to help someone in the school community diagnosed with breast cancer. The project took on new meaning the following year when teacher and past student Amanda Minotti passed away from cancer.

This year students and their sponsors helped raise $96,000 for Cancer Council Queensland and the Minotti Trust, surpassing the $51,000 given in 2017.

St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School students who gave of themselves for the Ponytail Project.

St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School students who gave of their luscious locks for the Ponytail Project.

“In a society where many are focused on appearance, the girls have been completely focused on helping others.”

Ponytails put to practical use

So what happens to the hair? It is donated to Real Fringe Hairbands, an organisation that makes hair bands for oncology and alopecia patients, or anyone who suffers from a hair-loss condition.

“In a society where many are focused on appearance, the girls have been completely focused on helping others,” St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School principal Ros Curtis said.

“They understand that it’s a small thing to lose some of their hair, when it can make a big difference to someone facing a huge life challenge,” she said.

Chopping block ... The moment that this St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School student's ponytail was cut.

Chopping block … The moment that this St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School student’s ponytail was cut.

“Funds raised enable Cancer Council Queensland to invest in vital cancer research.”

Hair today, help tomorrow

Cancer Council Queensland CEO Chris McMillan commended students on their efforts.

“With the help of the students at St Margaret’s Anglican Girls School, we are making a tangible difference in the fight against cancer and we cannot thank them enough,” she said.

“Funds raised enable Cancer Council Queensland to invest in vital cancer research, early detection and prevention programs, and local support services for Queenslanders affected by cancer,” Ms McMillan said.

Any school can take part in the project which runs until October. For more details go to ponytailproject.com.au


About the author: Warren Nunn has been a journalist for more than 40 years. For 27 years until 2013, he worked at Queensland’s main daily newspaper The Courier-Mail.

96five Email Updates

Get more news like this delivered straight to your inbox!
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
  • Get daily encouragement straight to your inbox

  • LifeWords will encourage you every day with a piece of Scripture and a practical application to your life from 96five's David Reay!